Sending Data to AWS without a route?

I am trying to understanding everything must go through Notehub?

Can’t I send data to AWS directly without setting up a route through Notehub?

For example using an Arduino MKR 1500 NB with a data plan there is a canned example:

This sketch securely connects to an AWS IoT using MQTT over NB IoT/LTE Cat M1.
It uses a private key stored in the ATECC508A and a public
certificate for SSL/TLS authetication.
It publishes a message every 5 seconds to arduino/outgoing
topic and subscribes to messages on the arduino/incoming
topic.

Can’t this be done using a note card?

If so how?

If not, why?

Thanks

Bruce

Hi @bvernham,

This is a great question. The simple answer is “no”, and it’s rooted in a very simple technical reason: Cellular Notecards are not on the Internet, and so anything that the Notecard does must be proxied through a Notehub. Technically speaking, for security reasons the Notecards connect to the cellular network, and then the cellular network communicates with the Notehub over a secure VLAN that is off-Internet.

Hopefully that answered your questions, if not let me know and I’m happy to dive deeper!

Thanks,
Rob

So why can a Sara R410 and the like send data directly to AWS?

Arduino/Sparkfun have multiple examples in which you can connect to AWS or another external web site?

I know, I did it yesterday with an Arduino MKR1500 NB.

I have a Hologram SIM for it but I was able to directly connect to other web sites with no routing through the Hologram? Hologram has the ability to do routes but it is not mainditory.

Why is it for Blues?

Another example is using Arduino IOT Cloud. No routing through the Hologram web site.

Blues seems to be very restrictive as to how a user can handle the data destination.

This is making it hard for me to justify developing a product around such a restrictive data portal.

Thanks

Bruce

Hi @bvernham,

I would propose that Blues is fundamentally making wireless IoT easier to implement and more secure by providing an integrated solution via a device-to-cloud data pump (the Notecard) and thin cloud service (Notehub). And yes, it is a bit of a paradigm shift when comparing the Notecard to a traditional cellular modem! In fact, using a cellular modem may be a better fit for your use case, which I totally understand.

Thanks,
Rob

But I am trying to understand how Blues is helping out by making it easier.

It seems like extra steps (and costs) need to be taken into account to use the Blues Wireless solution?

I can understand charging for data usage but now I have to pay to actually be able to do something with my data via routing fees?

That is the hard part I have understanding and justifying.

How is this a more economical solution then just using a standard cell modem?

Thanks

Bruce

Hi @bvernham,

The Notecard can be more economical than a traditional cellular modem in terms of dollars and in terms of time. While the following may not apply to everyone, we are betting that it does apply to many IoT developers:

  1. Dollars: You can spend ~$49 on a Notecard and architect your solution to stay within the bounds of the free Notehub plan for 10 years/500 MB of data. We are not trying to nickle-and-dime individual developers, but rather scale with you (i.e. we are successful only when you are successful).

  2. Time: We dramatically simplify security as we pre-provision the Notecard to speak securely with Notehub off the public Internet (via private VPN tunnels). This means no certificate management is required and no additional programming is needed.

  3. Time: There is very little programming overhead or boilerplate code required to send data from the Notecard to AWS (our whatever cloud you are using). Comparing a note.add request to the lines of code required for an HTTP/S request is a good example.

I would also add that routing itself in Notehub provides additional benefits, including using JSONata to alter/optimize data before it hits your remote endpoint and monitoring for successful transactions between Notehub and your cloud.

As mentioned, our solution may not be right for everyone. Best of luck though and let me know if I can answer any other questions!

1 Like

I can see both sides of the coin here but for one application I am thinking of AT & T having poor service here.

Verizon service is very good so how can I use the Blues hardware with Verizon?

I was told 1 bar enough but my idea is for remote monitoring of my vacation home when I am not here so I do not want to worry about good enough and want a cellular solution I know is reliable.

That is how I am sending this now, tethered to my phone.

No, there is no wired internet…the fiber ends 3 miles down the road so I need to use wireless.

So how does the blues hardware support working with Verizon beyond installing a Verizon IOT SIM?

Thanks

Any reply to the above?

Thanks

Hi @bvernham,

If you’re able to procure a Verizon IoT SIM it should work just fine with the Notecard (please consult the Using External SIM Cards guide for proper setup). This is assuming you have a Notecarrier with an external SIM slot as well.

Thanks,
Rob

OK, but where does the data go? Notehub?

You can easily procure Verizon SIM’s and service through Digikey so that is easy.

But then what?

How from there can I send data to AWS?

Thanks

Bruce

The Notecard/Notehub functionality doesn’t change based on the SIM/carrier you’re using. So it’s the same workflow as if you were using the embedded SIM: Notecard → Notehub → AWS.

Thanks,
Rob